Skip to content

Alumni Achievement!

July 9, 2016

narwhal imageCheck out this incredible project developed by two of our SLP graduates, Aryn Franklin and Tara Put, and OT graduate Laura Addington. They have created a fun and whimsical children’s book titled Narwhal Makes a Sandwich, incorporating knowledge they gained during their studies at the U of A and in their work. Through Kickstarter, the team raised the funds they needed and the book is already in print! There will be a launch party in Calgary this month, and the team is planning on holding a book signing in Edmonton soon after.

They are currently working on their supplementary tools, with a focus on multi-disciplinary activities, and those will be available on their website soon: www.narwhalmakesasandwich.com. The book will be available for purchase on their website within the next few weeks (and hopefully in a few local stores). They also have lots of photos, information, and contests on their social media accounts, and invite you to follow along! 

Facebook- www.facebook.com/narwhalmakesasandwich

Instagram- @narwhalmakesasandwich

Dog Day at Corbett Hall

June 29, 2016

Corbett Hall Dog Day on June 15th was an immense success! The members of the CSD 900 project “Must Love Dogs II” were overjoyed with the turnout and media coverage: http://globalnews.ca/…/how-dogs-are-helping-patients-with-p….

Members of TAAILS, as well as CHEEP‘s very own Shona and Jasper, came out to assist students from Speech-Language Pathology, Occupational Therapy, and Physical Therapy present information on the incorporation of animal-assisted therapy in rehab medicine. CAAWLS brought many furry therapy partners and information about volunteering with their organization, and the Edmonton Humane Society attended with a booth highlighting the importance of reading animal body language.

It was an hour of interdisciplinary collaboration extraordinaire: http://rehabilitation.ualberta.ca/…/dog-day-at-u-of-a-showc…

13435352_10157037273590284_196100848709397267_n

Here, Shona Nichols and Jasper join SLP students Jenny Reid and Jo Reimer in a demonstration of speech therapy with AAT.

More Tech Tips for the Class of 2018

June 19, 2016

Now that you are in the program, you may be thinking about how to take notes next year. I surveyed my class and here are some general ideas, in addition to the great piece Charlotte Smith wrote about Notability.

Of the people who responded, we had 13 Mac laptop users, and 9 of us did things the old fashioned way, with handwritten notes.   We had 5 PC laptop lovers, 3 iPad users, and 2 who did really well with the Microsoft Surface.

I was going to try to use a LiveScribe Pen with the notebooks that record lectures, but since our profs always provided lecture notes ahead of time, it was easier just to print things out and write directly on the slides–a little hard on the ink and paper budget, but it worked well for me.

Melanie took notes on adobe reader on her Mac and then (instead of doing the readings at night) went over the lectures and composed notes that consisted of slide key points and lecture tidbits combined, essentially creating a study guide as she went along in the semester. She then synthesized ideas into a cohesive main point document when exam time came up.

Darian took notes on her iPad slides first semester, but found writing/typing them out to study from was something she just didn’t have time to do. So she typed notes in class as we went along on her Mac second semester. When it came time to study she MUCH preferred having typed notes in class, saving hours of rewriting them out. It’s more mentally straining in class to try to keep up typing out everything on the slides and everything the profs say, but was definitely worth it for her.  Jill and Bethany agreed, as studying off the iPad was just not working.

Oliver wants to add that it depends. Some of the factors he thinks weigh into the decision-making process are whether lecture material are in PDF or PowerPoint format, the amount of diagrams/visuals in lectures, and the amount of content in lecture slides. He found PowerPoint in certain courses allowed him to type really good descriptive notes without worrying about text space or placement, while also being able to edit the text of the actual slides (using red coloured font). A difficult balance that he has been going back and forth on is copying and pasting PowerPoint/PDF lectures into a word document vs. listening and taking notes in class. He has been reading up on experiments investigating note-taking habits of university students. Apparently, students who use handwritten notes retain more information compared to students who take computer-typed notes even when factoring in study time with computer formulated notes. The researchers believe that handwritten notes forces students to think about the material, making them more likely to paraphrase and retain information. However, typed notes are usually copied verbatim from lectures and students rarely paraphrase. A happy medium for the convenience of digital media may be the use of an iPad and stylus or the Microsoft surface. I used an iPad with the note-taking software Notability. I found it stable with a great scroll feature for writing, as well as folders for organization. Lastly, he tends to like using flow charts to visually see the flow of lectures/courses and build an organization to classify and categorize information. The software MindNode worked quite nicely for him, but lacks top down organization.

Finally, a word from Charlene: In general, she tried to do readings before classes by taking notes to help prime. Then she took notes in class on her MacBook Air (ppt or pdf – didn’t really matter to her). After each class, she would make a handwritten mind map of the lecture to help understand how things were connected. Then, come final time, it was a lot easier to see how different lectures fit together, etc. She found it helped a ton doing that brief review every day because it was much more relaxing studying for finals! She tended to work off of objectives for some classes as a study guide and for others she used the profs’ guides.

And something we all want found lifesaving: SHARE.  We are given a google drive and can share resources, study notes, and, well, everything.  We now have a folder of activity ideas for Spring Clinic. And embrace your Facebook page. You are all a team now.

 

Tech Tips from the Class of 2017

June 19, 2016

11 Reasons I love Notability (by Charlotte Smith)

I have Notability for Mac and iPad—I love it and use it every day. I rarely take notes on paper anymore and I’ve really enjoyed not having to carry around binders. I’ve found it has helped me keep up with the pace of this program and still feel organized. Here are some reasons why I love it!

1. All my notes automatically sync between devices

If I want to pack light for a day, I’ll just bring my iPad and my notes will all be on my computer when I get home.

2. You can drag and drop import most types of documents

This works really well on my Mac: I just download the file from e-class and drop it into notability at the beginning of a lecture. On my iPad, I just select “open with” notability when downloading the file. Works for word, pdf and PowerPoint files, and usually takes less than 5 seconds to load.

3. You can write all over your notes in multiple colours

This keeps things fun. Having my notes in multiple colours is useful for some classes (stats) but also makes reading and rereading notes just a fraction more enjoyable.

4. It’s easy to zoom in and out

This was especially useful on my iPad when I wanted to draw small diagrams

5. You can switch back and forth from drawing, typing, and highlighting

I found I drew lots in stats, mostly just highlighted in anatomy, and typed in the rest. I really only used the drawing function on my iPad and found that using a stylus made things easier.

6. Everything syncs to google drive 

No risk of losing all your files! (Although you do have to set it up to do this)

7. It’s searchable

This is a new feature. The program still recognizes the text even after a PowerPoint is converted to pdf. It will also pick up on typed notes (not handwritten though).

8. You can add extra pages if you run out of space

You can insert a new page at any point in the document. You can also insert images. There were a few occasions when there were paper handouts that I wanted to include in a note, so I would just take a picture of it with my iPad and drop it in.

9. Easy drag and drop organization 

I have everything sorted by class.

10. You can scroll

This may sound like a given but a lot of PDF annotation apps will make you flip pages and this drives me crazy.

11. You only pay once

Even though this is an app you have to purchase, it does not require that you pay a subscription fee. With Evernote, on the other hand, you have to keep up your subscription to keep access to all the features. Last time I checked, Notability was $5.50. I’ve definitely got my money’s worth.

Only downside is you have to purchase it separately for each device.

Bonus: It has an audio recording feature

I’ve never used it, but I’ve heard people like it!

Downsides:

  • I’m pretty sure it is currently only for apple devices.
  • It can crash when you are searching. This has never affected data for me.
  • If you try to delete too many slides at once it can delete the whole note. This has only happened to me once but I would recommend going slow if you have to delete duplicate pages.

Some sample of what my notes look like below!

notability 1

notability 2

From us to you–the Class of 2017 welcomes the Class of 2018

June 19, 2016

It is amazing to think that we “First Years” are now the “Second Years.”  Soon we will be assigned our first-year buddies, and before we know it September will be here and we will be leading guided tours through Corbett Hall. Congratulations to everyone who is joining us in the Fall–we can’t wait to meet you!

Speechie Spotlight 4 – Class of 2017

March 27, 2016

This month we caught two more students in our spotlight.  Say hello to Kelsey Grant and Bradie Dushanek!

KG1.png
KG2

Bradie1
Bradie2.png
Bradie3.png

Shine On!

February 19, 2016

Do you ever wonder what’s happening with the previous SLP class?  We decided to catch up with a couple of them–and if there are any other Second Year students or alumni out there with a great story to tell, please contact us at uaspeech@ualberta.ca so that we can shine a spotlight on you, too. For our first look into the life of a second year, we have two people in the spotlight: Genevieve Roberts, former TV star (seriously–see below!) and previous co-president of OASIS, and Jenelle MacDonald, who is one of our amazing Audiology TAs this term.  In her case, we dug up an old unpublished spotlight, so that we can look at her then and now!

GR1
GR2
GR3

JM1
JM2
JM3
JM4
JM5

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 99 other followers